The Benefits Of Visual Messaging In Business Communication Today

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Smiling Work Team

Sending SMS online is one of the quickest and easiest ways for businesses to exploit the power of SMS and can bring huge benefits. You should be mindful of the key features to look out for in a reliable SMS tool. In recent years, the use of sending Business SMS has grown at a rapid rate, primarily as it allows businesses communicate effectively and at low cost. Sending SMS via the Web as opposed to sending SMS via your mobile phone makes sense for many reasons. The key benefit is that it’s very quick, so it should be your communication tool of choice when sending SMS to groups. With most Web-based SMS applications, you can upload multiple contacts in one go (often from a csv file), type your SMS message and hit send – saving you lots of time.

Email is another effective visual form of business communication. If you find that you’re making several points in the email, consider the impact of the recipient seeing them in separate emails with unique subject lines. It will also help you keep track of separate issues as well as make it easy for the people you are sending to see them at a glance.

Remember, your communication systems are important. They will be your backbone, for without the proper Business communication skills devices, your company will suffer. Also pay close attention to how you manage phone calls and record notes about conversations. Do you have a phone program that may manage calls throughout the day? Do you have a separate voicemail number for small business messages, or do you divert calls to your private voicemail? Create email accounts for your staff, and make a decision on the main communication strategies that you might use for your team.

Finally, be human: You build a relationship by face to face contact and sharing personal experiences with another person. And if they accept you and they share experiences with you, a friendship has been born. And isn’t that what a good communicator does, reaches out, shows he or she is human, shares a painful experience with you?

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Understanding the Process of Interpersonal Communication

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Through the interpersonal communication process, people maintain and adjust this self-image. The paradigm of human communication is dyadic: two people have a conversation. However, humans have always sought means of extending and enhancing face-to-face communication.

New technology as extended the reach of communication as well as altered the way human relate information to each other.

First, media have had a powerful impact on people’s initial perceptions of other interpersonal transactions. Second, they have influenced the manner in which information about other transactions is processed and interpreted. Third, media distracts persons from the gathering the kind of information they need for effective interpersonal communication.

Models of the interpersonal communication process provide the basis for understanding the complexities of organisation communication.

In the Workplace

Performance appraisal is an interpersonal communication process. Even between two people, it is often not done well. Automating the process is a waste of money and time, and HR departments that go that route are doing charitable work for the vendors of the software. Perception is a vital aspect in the interpersonal communication process. How we perceive ourselves and others affects the way we interpret messages and how we handle ourselves in a given situation.

Beliefs, expectations, hopes, and the other thoughts of both parties affect the interpersonal communication process. People often assume they have successfully delivered or understood a message when in reality they have not. Communication involves more than just talking. It also takes deciding what to say and how, listening, “decoding” signals—words and body language—and checking back on the accuracy of interpretation.

Final Thought

The Ultimate objective of an organization can be attained by maintaining an effective interpersonal communication process, which is an essential part of the organizational behavior study.

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What Managers Should Know About Cross-Cultural Communication

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Imagine that your company sends you to Japan for a technical meeting. The Japanese company’s representative comes to your hotel room and inquires if you have had your lunch. You tell him that you are anxious to try some sushi. You feel great when he invites you to the hotel restaurant, where a gracious
waiter encourages you to try various kinds of sushi. A while later, you begin to feel very bad, when you realize that your host has just paid $300 to $400 for your lunch. This happened to a manager of a high tech Colorado company about 20 years ago. Today, due to the lessons he has learnt over the years through an ongoing contact with the Japanese vendors, he is unlikely to experience another culture shock.

Use Face to Face Communication to Build Bridges

Forget about email and telephone when trying to establish operations or find vendors abroad, advises Scott Meyer, who has worked for many years in Europe. Instead, go on an extended business trip to the country of interest. Try to spend time in the major metropolitan areas, as well as in less popular peripheral locales. Immerse yourself into that country’s culture, develop insights into the dynamics of country’s business culture. Experience first-hand how people in that county react to products or services, similar to yours. Establish personal relationships and business contacts.

Use Interpreters Wisely

Do not underestimate the role of an interpreter in a cross-cultural setting. A similar cultural background between the non-English-speaking client or vendor and the interpreter will make communication easier. There are two types of interpreters. Simultaneous interpreters facilitate conferences with a large number of attendees. Simultaneous interpretation requires special equipment that allows the presenter to speak without pausing while the interpreter listens through the headphone and interprets the speech. Consecutive interpreters are better suited for small meetings and tradeshows, where the speaker would pause after few sentences so that the interpreter can relay the message. When using a consecutive interpreter it is important to pace your presentation and let the interpreter and the listeners keep up with it. Use humor sparingly. Avoid jokes that rely on the English language puns and wordplay, or on an understanding of the U.S. culture.

When hosting a contact from abroad for the first time, do not make assumptions as to whether that person will or will not need an interpreter. Foreign visitors will view your offer the services of an interpreter as a sign of respect for their language and culture.

Plan Your Cross-Cultural Meetings Carefully

The Japanese have a different concept of time, explains Bob Ariniello, the media products’ vice president of Exabyte Corporation. Time is not as important a criterion for the Japanese, as it is for us, especially when it comes to schedules and timelines. When planning a business trip to Japan, it makes sense to allow at least twice as much time, as you normally would. The Japanese culture is evasive. Realize that when your vendors tell you they will study the issue, that may be their way of saying no. To get to a yes, let them take time to build consensus. Spending extended time in business meetings will give both sides the opportunity to resolve the underlying issues.

Avoid Assumptions About Cultural Similarities

It is common for people to view the world through their own cultural worldview, to attach culturally-based meanings to what we see and hear. In cross-cultural situations, however, it is easy to create a misunderstanding by viewing people from other cultures, as if they are similar to us. Incorrect assumptions about the meaning of similarities may cause us to stereotype or misjudge people and situations. Some Asian cultures, for example, use a smile as a mask when dealing with unpleasant situations. In our culture a smile is associated with pleasant emotions and projects friendliness.

Develop and Practice Cross-Cultural Awareness

In any country the operating parameters are set by rules, established practices and cultural attitudes. Cross-cultural awareness is a skill, based on a set of
interpersonal characteristics, that allows effective managers to be open to other cultures, different from their own. This skill can be learned and needs to be
practiced. Even in English-speaking countries, such as Australia, “nothing should be taken for granted”, cautions Jerri Paulison, organizational development manager for Cobe Cardiovascular, Inc. She stresses the importance of good listening skills, patience and talking to people, who are intimately familiar with the country you intend to do business with, as well as obtaining additional information through reading.

In summary, any cross-cultural business situation is a journey. There are going to be differences. Expect them. Learn to appreciate them. Learn from them.
Learn to adapt.

 

Article Author: All Language Alliance, Inc. –  Nina Ivanichvili

– Nina Ivanichvili is CEO of All Language Alliance Inc.,
www.languagealliance.com, a foreign language translation firm specializing in legal, technical, financial, and medical translation and interpretation services in over 80 languages. She can be reached at 303-470-9555

Article Source: http://www.articlealley.com/article_117184_15.html

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