Benefits of Improved Workplace Communications

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It’s rare to find a small, innovative business that does not allow for open communications inside its office. Most newer businesses have embraced the benefits presented to them by more communication, and have seen how it has grown their business.

There are, however, still some businesses that are behind the times and are currently managing in the old top-down style. These closed-door offices do not facilitate open communication, and can lead to some challenges along the way. Over the next few years, many of these businesses will be moving toward a culture that embraces workplace communication to improve their business processes.

So what are the benefits to improved workplace communications? Here are a few favorites.

Increased Transparency

Gone are the days of closed-door policies in the office. Having open communications and greater awareness as to the ongoing activity inside the company gives each team member the chance to understand how their work is making an impact, and can encourage them to work harder toward their goals.

Increased Innovation

Improving the communications inside the workplace can enhance brainstorming sessions, and allow for teammates to bounce ideas off one another every day, which increases innovation for the business.

Increased Team Building

A closer team yields a more productive team. Allowing for stronger communications between team members increases their relationships and their ability to work well together, thus providing you with a more tightly-knit team to build your business.

Increased Project Completion

When you open the doors to communication inside your business, and your team is working together on their projects, their productivity will inevitably increase. They will be able to chat around each project and task, and work together to build the best ideas for each project and task, and their work will be completed better and faster.

Increased Business Success

With all the benefits outlined above, you can easily see how improved workplace communications can increase the overall success of your business. A stronger, more innovative team that is working hard together will help bring your business into the future with a solid foundation based on effective communication.

If you’re still unsure how to increase your workplace communications, or aren’t sure you want to experience all the benefits it has to offer, start by opening discussions with your senior team members. Then, work together to build out a communicative and collaborative culture in your business today. You won’t regret this decision when you feel the great impact of improved communications in your business.

Article Author: Dana Larson

Article Source: http://www.articlealley.com/article_1741689_15.html

About the Author:

http://www.oneplacehome.com

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How to Master Intercultural Communication

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Interacting with people from other cultures can be fascinating.  Whether you are abroad or on home turf, you are often exposed to new and fascinating ways of doing things.  If you are about to take a trip to another country, it is a good idea to brush up on the culture and traditions in advance of your departure.  This can be instrumental in avoiding potential miscommunication.  If you are dealing with people from many cultures on a routine basis, some fundamental  information about value systems and how people relate in certain parts of the world can be invaluable. It will help you know how to interact in an appropriate way. Concentrating on five basic categories will give you a running start when interacting with individuals from other cultures.

INDIVIDUALISTIC and COLLECTIVISTIC CULTURES

Individualistic Cultures foster individualism and focus on individual goals.
There is a preference for ‘equal’ relationships, and behavior cannot be predicted from group memberships.  Representative Cultures: Australia, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, England, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, New Zealand, Sweden and the United States.

Collectivistic Cultures focus on group goals. There is strong emphasis on traditions and conformity. Representative Cultures:  Argentina, Brazil, China, Egypt, Ethiopia, Greece, Guatemala, India, Japan, Korea, Mexico and Saudi Arabia.

MASCULINE and FEMININE CULTURES

Masculine Cultures have differentiated gender roles and are characterized by power, assertiveness and performance. Representative Cultures: Arab cultures, Austria, Germany, Italy,Jamaica, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand, Switzerland and Venezuela.

Feminine Cultures value quality of life and service. Sex roles are androgynous. Feminine cultures have overlapping gender roles. Representative Cultures: Chile, Costa Rica, Denmark, East African cultures, Finland, Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Sweden and Thailand.

LOW and HIGH POWER DISTANCE CULTURES

With Low Power Distance Cultures, individuals are viewed as equals. Emphasis is placed on legitimate power. Superiors and subordinates are interdependent. Representative Cultures: Australia, Canada, Denmark, Germany, Ireland, Israel, New Zealand, Sweden and the United States.

With High Power Distance Cultures, individuals are seen as unequal. Subordinates
are dependent on those above them. Representative Cultures: Egypt, Ethiopia, Ghana, India, Malaysia, Nigeria, Panama, Saudi Arabia and Venezuela.

LOW and HIGH UNCERTAINTY AVOIDANCE CULTURES

Low Uncertainty Avoidance Cultures are characterized by low stress and anxiety. Dissent is acceptable. There is a high level of risk taking. Uncertainty is OK. Representative Cultures: Canada, Denmark, England, Hong Kong, India, Jamaica, Sweden and the United States.

High Uncertainty Avoidance Cultures are characterized by high stress and anxiety. There is a strong desire for agreement. People do not like to take risks. Representative Cultures: Egypt, Argentina, Belgium, Chile, France, Greece, Japan and Mexico.

LOW CONTEXT and HIGH CONTEXT COMMUNICATION

High Content/Low Context Messages are direct and clear with most of the message explicit in the code. This form predominates in individualistic cultures.

High Context/Low Content Messages are indirect and ambiguous. Most of the information is internalized in the person or his surroundings. This form is found more typically in collectivistic cultures.

Be  aware of cultural differences and how they should impact your communication.  When you’re not sure how to proceed, be respectful.  That goes a long way in successfully establishing relationships.

Carol Dunitz, Ph.D. is president of The Last Word LLC, a communication and creative services company.  She is a professional speaker and author of ‘Louder Than Thunder,’ a parable about listening and interpersonal communication.  Dunitz is the playwright, lyricist and composer of ‘Bernhardt on Broadway,’ a musical about Sarah Bernhardt.  She can be reached at 312.523.4774, cdunitz@lastword.com or www.DrCarolDunitz.com.

Article Author: Carol Dunitz, Ph.D.

Article Source: http://www.articlealley.com/article_1175282_15.html

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