Leveraging DISC Assessment to Enhance Executive Coaching Strategies

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Fostering a supportive team environment and fortifying corporate bonds will help to increase productivity and profitability within the workplace.  Incorporating the use of behavioral assessments within review processes and meetings can help leaders to identify ways to approach particular employees when trying to build their skill sets.  Leveraging DISC assessment to enhance executive coaching strategies is your first step in creating stronger team players, and inevitably, a stronger team.

Prior to developing the skills of others, a leader must first refine and perfect his or her own mentoring approach.  DISC assessment can help leaders to understand their own strengths and weaknesses, and teach them how to improve upon particular personality traits.  In order to strengthen the foundation of leadership and create a healthy team, leaders must display solid communication skills, interpersonal skills, and motivational skills as well as the ability to set solid goals for both individuals and teams, and provide guidance in a positive way.  DISC assessments allow leaders to identify qualities that will enable them to positively impact their teams while simultaneously achieving personal goals.  Further, solid leaders will be able to inspire commitment, trust, and loyalty amongst their teams while providing advice in a caring, non-threatening manner in order to increase the productivity of and drive the overall success of the team.

Once leaders have worked on ameliorating their own traits, they can then leverage the use of DISC assessment to understand how to more effectively approach, reach, and nurture individual employees.  Identifying and understanding the unique behavioral and communicational styles of particular employees will enable leaders to more successfully communicate with each member of a team.  Further, behavioral assessments, like DISC, can help both leaders and employees to understand how their individual choices impact the actions of others, how to make themselves aware of their strengths and weaknesses, and how to learn to give and receive feedback.  Behavioral assessments may also succeed in encouraging employees to learn, train, and acquire new skills in order to proactively enhance their individual performance levels.  Leveraging DISC assessment to grow executive coaching strategies that promote teamwork and employee interaction will likely result in greater productivity.

DISC assessment can also help to enhance corporate coaching strategies designed to reduce and cope with stress as well as those dedicated to increasing motivation and learning how to retain talent.  If leaders can effectively motivate employees while simultaneously challenging them and providing them with more opportunities, then the company will benefit in terms of both employee satisfaction and overall success.  Retaining superior talent is critical to the success of any company in today’s economic state.  Avoiding rehiring and training costs can dramatically reduce a company’s overhead.   Leveraging DISC assessment to understand how to appeal to the emotional and mental needs of strong employees will help in maintaining a positive, energetic, and happy atmosphere.

DISC assessment is a vital tool when it comes to developing and maintaining a productive, yet enjoyable, work environment.  By understanding and improving upon your own strengths and weaknesses as a leader as well as the needs and goals of individual employees, DISC assessment will enable you to more effectively design your executive coaching strategies so that you can efficiently transform your efforts into productive and profitable results.

About ‘Your Ultimate Success, Inc’ at discassessment.org:
Founded in 2005, Your Ultimate Success, Inc. has been providing companies, corporations and individuals with coaching, behavioral and values assessments, team building, job benchmarking, and indoor/outdoor experiential learning/team building.  Headed by Jim and Jeannine Guerci, the team is committed to instilling positive change through personal and professional development.

Article Author: cguerci

Article Source: http://www.articlealley.com/http://www.articlealley.com/leveraging-disc-assessment-to-enhance-executive-coaching-strategies-844185.html

About the Author: Founded in 2005, Your Ultimate Success, Inc. has been providing companies, corporations and individuals with coaching, behavioral and values assessments, team building, job benchmarking, and indoor/outdoor experiential learning/team building.  Headed by Jim and Jeannine Guerci, the team is committed to instilling positive change through personal and professional development

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Six of the Most Common Leadership Communication Styles

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Author: Simon Lee Smith

There was an interesting article in PR Week last week, on the subject of leadership communication. Entitled ‘Get the best out of your boss’ it outlines six of the most common leadership styles and suggests how communicators can best play to the personalities of their leaders. It’s a nice reminder of the breadth of styles we have to work with and provides some useful pointers on how to play to your boss’s particular strengths.
 
The six leadership styles – and the supporting descriptions (I’ve paraphrased) are:

1. Visionary leader – the classic rock star CEO who sets the big-picture and excels at moving people towards a shared vision. These leaders are superb public speakers and enjoy life in the spotlight. Barack Obama is a good example.
2. Affiliative leader – this type of leader wants to be your friend. A collaborative figure, the affiliative leader focuses on emotional needs and is most likely to ask ‘how are you?’. Angela Merkel is held up as an example. 
3. Coaching leader – holds long conversations that often extend beyond the work place. Good at helping employees identify their strengths and weaknesses and linking these to career goals. Step forward Dr Who.
4. Democratic leader -these are the great listening leaders, though this is sometimes at the expense of decisive action. Favorite catchphrases include ‘what do you think?’. They like to show the way without pushing people in a particular direction. Lord Sebastian Coe is a good example.
5. Pacesetter leader – most likely to say ‘copy me’, these hard working leaders never shirk a challenge and lead by example. One downside is that they often expect employees to automatically get the picture. Step forward Margaret Thatcher…
6. Commanding leader – an old-school taskmaster who brings the dynamics of the playground into the boardroom. Very command and control in style they stick to one clear direction and refuse to consider an alternative routes or messages. Montgomery Burns is a good example. 

The communicators quoted in the article, among them David Ferrabee and James Harkness, provide lots of useful advice on working with these types, including:

Providing visionary leaders the right platform and sufficient time to explain their vision to others and gather feedback. High profile tactics like webcasts and regular publication profiles go down well with these types, but they may sometimes lack an eye for detail and require specific IC support in this area.

Identifying opportunities for affiliative leaders to show their steel. Tactics like back to the floor are useful here, as are structured team meetings which focus on sharing constructive feedback. One classic issue with these types is their desire to communicate only the positive messages.

Playing to the strengths of coaching leaders by encouraging them to host small, intimate sessions and focus on helping people turn strategy into action. These types are not great at big picture, but excel at one-to-one.

Creating high-involvement forums for democratic leaders – workshops, online forums and blogs are particularly powerful. Clear, decisions communications help overcome this leader’s tendency towards indecision. Arm them with insights and intelligence about the workforce and they should respond well.

Encouraging the pacesetting leader to be more inclusive, more considerate of the feelings of others and creating plenty of listening opportunities. Inclusivity is key here and tactics like recognition programmes and use of social media channels can be useful.

Context is critical for the commanding leader. Rather than just explaining what to people, they need to focus on building understanding around the why. Big picture strategy is important here – and tactics like learning maps and visuals and strategy tool kits can be very handy.  Listening channels are important too – and employees may require anonymity as commanding leaders can breed distrust and fear. Coaching in body language is also useful. Visit us at  Gatehouse Group for more information on Communication. 

Author: Lee Smith is co-founder of Gatehouse, an internal communication  agency, consultancy on internal communications, internal comms, employee communication, research, audit, jobs, change management and employee engagement.

Article Source: http://www.articlealley.com/article_1050457_15.html

About the Author:

http://www.gatehousegroup.co.uk

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Essential Skills for Creating A Dynamite Relationship with Your Boss

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By: Gail Solish

At some point in our lives most of us will be working for someone else, so it is important to fully understand what makes our boss tick and how best to interact and influence him or her. How much attention have you given to your boss’s personality style? How does she function? What seems to agitate or please her? If we have a difficult boss we focus on what drives us crazy. If we have a great boss we tend to take things for granted. Recognizing the factors which contribute to creating the most successful, powerful working relationship is a skill to be utilized throughout one’s career.

One of the ways to do this is by identifying your boss’s personality type. Let’s look at a few examples. Jo’s boss is extroverted, high energy, with lots of ideas which he makes happen. He tends to move quickly and rarely acknowledges the good work his staff does. He assumes they know he appreciates and values them. Bill’s boss is hard working and organized but tends to micromanage her staff. Bill worries that his boss does not trust him to do his job and therefore would not recommend him for a promotion. These are two different kinds of bosses, with different personality types. What does this mean for their colleagues and staff?

According to Mike Lillibridge who is one of the creators of the PeoplemapTM Personality Types, there are four Personality Types: Leader, People, Free Spirit and Task. Generally most people are a combination of two. The clearer you are on what type your boss is, as well as your type, the more capable you become in understanding how he functions, what are the strengths and weaknesses and how you can achieve the best results in working together.

Leader types are results oriented. They see the big picture and want to make it happen. They describe themselves as being assertive, honest, face problems directly and are willing to make hard decisions. Further, they admit to at times being impatient with others and often forget the importance of complimenting and acknowledging others.

People types are relationship oriented. They seek out others, enjoy working collaboratively, tend to be great communicators and listeners and enjoy helping others. They describe themselves as being social, caring, tend to seek approval and avoid conflict. This can lead to them having difficulty making decisions which others may not like.

The Free Spirit personality seeks adventure and excitement. They are risk takers and think outside the box. They tend to be great at problem solving, very creative and operate well in crises, but have difficulty with details and follow through. Hard handed authority does not work well with them and they are often easily distracted and bored by mundane tasks.

The last personality type is the Task type. They love work and organize themselves and others through having concrete plans and systems to manage all situations. They are good detail people and thrive on predictability. Their downfall is that they can be demanding of themselves and others in terms of expecting perfection and have great difficulty adjusting to change.

As you review these personality types, it will probably be fairly obvious to you which ones best describe you. Remember, generally we have qualities of at least two. Now think about your boss and which types best describe him/her. Is it similar or different from you?

Let’s return to our two examples. Jo’s boss is a Leader, Free spirit, while Jo is a People, Task. They are quite opposite, but at the same compliment each other’s strengths and weaknesses. The clearer Jo becomes in recognizing her boss’s personality style, the less upset she is with his “way of doing things”. She begins to value and learn from him and develops the comfort to make suggestions which will be helpful to him, such as acknowledging his staff more directly.

Bill’s boss is Task, Leader type, while Bill is People, Task type. Since they both are Task, they tend to focus on the detail and feel better when they know everything is taken care of. When Bill understands that his Boss is similar to him, then he is able to recognize that she does trust him, but becomes preoccupied with the details, just like him. He is able to use his people skills to develop a more collaborative relationship with her.

Understanding your boss’s personality as well as your own, creates a more effective and positive working relationship. When you come from a position of wanting to work well together, even when there are differences, it leads to a win-win situation. If you are interested in learning more about the PeoplemapTM personality assessment and how to use it in creating the most productive and favorable workplace, please contact me.

Copyright 2007, Gail Solish.

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Gail Solish, provides Executive/Personal coaching to managers, directors and executives focused on workplace development and relationship management. Claim your FR-EE e-course “Unleash Your Potential and Increase Productivity and Fulfillment” at www.ActualizeYourGoals.com

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