How to Give Feedback to Manage Performance

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Author: Kate Tammemagi

Receiving feedback on your effort, your attitude or your performance is the way that you learn, improve or are motivated to maintain a good performance. Giving feedback effectively and frequently is a key requirement of the role of Manager or Supervisor. Giving and receiving feedback should be a normal part of the Leader and Team Member relationship, a process that both parties understand and accept. It is best practice for the Supervisor to begin giving feedback as part of the initial training period, and to continue this in regular performance coaching sessions throughout the employee’s career.

Positive Feedback
Positive feedback can be given any time, either in public or private. Positive feedback is where we praise a desired attitude, behaviour or performance. The effect of positive feedback is that the person is encouraged to repeat this behaviour and is also motivated to improve. It also builds self confidence and self esteem in the Team Member.

The reverse is also true! Lack of positive feedback is discouraging, demotivating and will lead to a poor performance level. The employee gets the impression that no-one cares whether they do well or not, and that their work has no value!

Giving Constructive  Feedback

The other type of feedback is Constructive Feedback, or Corrective Feedback. Again, this is essential to performance and motivation. Do not think in terms of NEGATIVE feedback as this is not a useful thought. The aim is not to point out the negative or the bad. If you do this, you will find that the person does not improve. You will find yourself saying the same things over and over again.

Giving constructive feedback is about TRAINING the other person to change or improve. If you do this well, you training is successful and will see the desired result. Giving constructive feedback is about identifying an area for improvement and working out solutions to improve or correct this. In giving the feedback, first identify the current goal or task and why this is important to the Company and to the role. Secondly, state clearly the undesirable attitude, behaviour or performance, with factual evidence. Thirdly, state the desired attitude, behaviour or performance, or better still, ask encouraging questions to help the other person make constructive suggestions. Lastly, work with them to put a strategy in place for achieving the desired goal.

Guidelines for giving Feedback Effectively

1. Understand that the feedback is primarily a training need. Be aware that you are the supervisor, and are ultimately responsible for this staff’s behaviour. This feedback is aimed at improving knowledge and behaviour.

2. The key is to talk about the behaviour, performance or attitude rather than the person.

3. Have a good working knowledge of your own learning style and the other types of learning styles. This will help you avoid the pitfall of explaining in a way only YOU would understand. Other people are not always like you!

4. Know your Team Member, their personality style and their unique learning style – Are they a visual, verbal, reading & writing, tactile? Do they have language and cultural complexities?

5. Know your own limitations – If you are giving feedback on a volatile situation, make sure you can recognize your own emotions, and are aware that you may need to calm down before feedback.

6. Give constructive feedback in private – Never give constructive feedback in a group. You would not want to receive it in front of your staff!

7. Always start with positive – When giving feedback you always start with at least two positive observations. This will start the meeting off on a positive note

8. Look at the individual – make eye contact, don’t avoid. If you do, they may question the validity of your session.

9. No apologies, do not apologize for their actions that need correction. Don’t say, “I’m sorry to tell you this, but…”

10. Give constructive feedback in an honest and diplomatic way – that is, while pinpointing the target behaviour, state the constructive measures to change the behaviour. Remember, constructive feedback is a means to improving situations by finding a solution to the problem. Give a due date for follow up. The point is to teach a new skill where there was a deficiency.

11. End with a positive – If it was a particularly lengthy/ gruesome session, interact with the staff to make sure things are ok. Be sure that you have checked in with them before you leave for the day. You want to make sure they are not going home disappointed.

12. Ask if they have any questions – if you have given a feedback session, you may not have realised that you were the only one talking for quite some time. Always give the staff the opportunity to seek further knowledge or assistance.
Kate Tammemagi specialises in Management Training in Ireland. She designs and delivers People Management Training and Customer Care Training.
Article Source: http://www.articlealley.com/how-to-give-feedback-to-manage-performance-1335512.html

About the Author: Kate Tammemagi is Trainer and Consultant in Ireland. She specialises in delivering customised Customer Service Training Courses and Leadership Development Training Courses  in businesses,  call centres and professional environments.

http://www.focustraining.ie

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Why Listening Skills Are Needed in Hospitality Management

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Possessing listening skills is one of the most important requirements for holding a job in hospitality management.  That may not seem obvious at first, but when you think about everything involved in restaurant and hotel management this statement makes perfect sense.  Hospitality is defined as kindness to strangers and as a relationship process.  The best definition focuses on the relationship and process aspects, because anyone working in the hospitality business knows that it takes ongoing attention and consideration to properly serve people in a way they appreciate.

Being a good hospitality manager means being able to identify the needs of customers and staff.  This often comes down to being a good listener.  A good listener pays attention when people talk and doesn’t assimilate the information with pre-conceived notions.  A good listener is able to separate the important information from the rest of what is said and use that information to improve service.  In other words, good listening skills can be considered both a motivational and customer service tool.

Goal Driven Hospitality

As a restaurant or hotel manager you have several goals to always keep in mind.

    * Keep customers satisfied with service and hospitality
    * Find creative solutions to potential problems

    * Develop ways to stay competitive
    * Be responsive to customer needs
    * Maintain productive staff working environment that promotes creativity and maintains morale

These are major goals that require a well-trained manager who has the right listening skills in addition to the ability to generate new ideas that can be successfully implemented.

Good listening skills involve much more than just hearing what people are saying.  As a restaurant, hotel or even cosmetology manager you have to be able to read between the lines and determine what services or problems you need to address.  People often express ideas or concerns indirectly and it’s up to the manager to properly interpret what is being said.  The hospitality industry is extremely competitive and that makes customer satisfaction a top priority.

But a good manager also learns to listen to his or her staff.  A commercial cook, patisserie or gourmet chef, or a hotel manager must develop a team of people that work well together.  The staff must have the same vision and the same commitment to customer service as the manager.  Being able to listen to staff needs also is imperative in order to be a good manager.

Ideas that Motivate

The hospitality business is fast paced and demanding.  The more the staff works like a team, the smoother the operation.  Managers are responsible for coordinating the efforts of a diverse group of people.  But staff also will have great ideas about how to improve operations and how to add or improve services to improve customer satisfaction.  A sign of a good manager is one who is able to listen to the ideas and then make decisions as to their use in a way that motivates and does not discourage staff.

Hospitality management is all about creating customer satisfaction in a highly competitive and fast paced environment by motivating employees to provide great service.  That’s why listening skills are needed in hospitality management!

Academia International is a leading international college providing cooking courses, hospitality management training, hairdressing courses, and beauty courses. 

Article Author: Andrew Johnstone

Article Source: http://www.articlealley.com/article_683589_22.html

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Small Business Networking – Building Rapport With People

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Networking is an essential part of life today online as well as off-line in the real world. Whether you are networking online or off-line you will still need to build rapport with people. Work colleagues, other small business owners, domestic and commercial neighbours, customers, business partners or associates, suppliers and delivery people. In fact, everywhere you turn and see another person, you need to build some sort of rapport with them even if it is just to acknowledge their presence.

It isn't hard to build rapport with people. The starting point is simply acknowledging that they exist, that you see them. It is very rude to ignore people. No-one likes to be ignored. So simply by smiling, nodding or saying a friendly hello, is how one starts to build a relationship with those around us.

If you start by simply saying hello, it doesn't take any time at all to progress to the next stage of o talking about where you both are, or commenting on something that is common to both of you. Starting a conversation is very easy once you remember that the other person could well be as uncertain or shy as yourself

If you employ staff, it does not give you the right to be rude to them and treat them disrespectfully. Building good rapport with your staff is one of the cheapest ways a business owner can protect their business from theft and bad word of mouth advertising. Disgruntled, disloyal staff can harm your business more than most business owners would care to admit.

The next easy step in building rapport with those around you is to simply start a conversation with them. First you say hello and then make a small comment even if it is just about the weather. Perhaps this is why so much attention is paid to the weather. It is a good innocuous way to start a conversation. Keep the comments light and cheery because no one wants to be weighed down with gloom because they made “the” mistake of talking with you. Don't depress people even if you have had the worst day of your life.

Building rapport is all about building a relationship with someone; nothing more and nothing less.

The Concise Oxford dictionary (1964) defines rapport:

n. Communication, Relationship, Connection

So if we follow the steps to building rapport with people, a method of doing so could well be by following the meaning of the word in starting with communication to build a relationship which will form into a connection. In a business environment these connections are what end up translating into a profitable business but most of all it will give yourself and all those around you, a comfortable environment in which to live and thrive.

These relationships make up a significant quality to our lives. With lots of speaking acquaintances with whom we can share our days, people seem to have a better quality and quantity of life. It has now been proven by numerous scientific studies that people who have friends live longer and healthier lives. Rapport builds relationships, relationships develop or not into friendships. Some friendships last us all our lives.

Knowing how Small Business Networking online and off-line can improve your bottom line keeps many small businesses in business today

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=JM_Smith
http://EzineArticles.com/?Small-Business-Networking—Building-Rapport-With-People&id=4363951

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