Quick and Easy Interpersonal Communication Success

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Whatever reason you have for wanting to improve your speaking or listening skills, you can pick up some useful tips from interpersonal communication articles. Reading about the techniques and tips lets you digest the information when you’re not under pressure to communicate. It can be a nerve-wracking thing if you’re not confident in your ability to talk, sometimes even in everyday casual conversation, and it’s such a shame as you should have a lot of fun with interpersonal communication; articles can teach you some of the basics.

The skills that you need for good interpersonal communication differ according to the situation in which you want to communicate.

Some people find it difficult to start or continue conversations even with friends; others will need to deliver seminars and get their points across on subjects an audience is unfamiliar with; others will need to organize and communicate within a large organization, to people both above and below them in the company hierarchy as well as fellow managers on their level. That is only a small selection of the different situations in which one might need interpersonal skills.

However, whatever the situation, interpersonal communication articles will all tell you that both listening and speaking are important.

Listening skills might include:

1. Giving the other person time to speak without butting in with whatever it is that you want to say. That way you will put them at ease and you ma well learn something;

2. if you don’t let them talk you have no chance to learn from them and you are then giving a lecture, not communicating.

3. Not finishing other people’s sentences. You’re not a mind reader and so it can be seen as rather rude to finish off other people’s sentences. Let them tell you themselves.

4. Really actively listening to the person’s words so that you understand the full meaning of what they are trying to say. If you are busy wit other tasks or the TV or some other distraction, you are not listening as well as you might.

5. Maintaining a comfortable level of eye contact to put the other person at ease.

6. Adapting your body language to demonstrate that you are listening and that you really understand what is being said; for instance, making sure that you are nodding and smiling in the right places and adopting an appropriate posture.

7. Concentrating full on the moment and picking up on the mood of the person who is speaking as well as the actual words they are using.

Those listening skills will really benefit you in all your interpersonal communications, no matter what the purpose or who you are trying to communicate with. Some speaking skills are generic too, and therefore useful in all communication:

1. Speak clearly so that your words can be understood. Quite often people will be too embarrassed to ask you to repeat yourself so you need to take the responsibility for being as clear as possible.

2. Use a vocabulary that can be understood by your listeners. Interpersonal communication is about being understood; it is not about showing off how wide your vocabulary is or how many long words you know.

3. Use an appropriate pace and volume. You can’t be heard, you can’t be understood or effectively communicate anything.

4. Make your call to action clear so that your listeners know what you want them to do.

5. Check people’s understanding. Don’t probe, but you could ask questions to check your audience’s understanding, or if you feel that your audience knows you well enough and will tell you if they don’t understand anything or have a question to ask, you could invite questions.

Although interpersonal communication articles can help you through all of these basic skills and more they are are no replacement for the real thing and what you need is practice, practice, practice and hopefully you will enjoy that.

Peter Murphy is a peak performance expert. He recently produced a very popular free report: 10 Simple Steps to Developing Communication Confidence. Apply now because it is available only at: communication skills

Article from articlesbase.com

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Effective Communication Strategies In The Workplace: 3 Ways To Get Your Point Across

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Having effective communication strategies in the workplace poses many benefits. They make for a more productive and healthy work environment. Unfortunately, a lot of people don’t really know how to communicate themselves properly. Let me give you an example…

Isn’t it funny how a simple message can transform into something completely different when passed on from one person to another? News about “the boss going to a baby shower this weekend” can sometimes turn into “the boss going to have a baby this weekend.”

Imagine just how uncontrollable that piece of information could be. It is precisely for this reason that effective communication strategies are needed in the workplace. They ensure that everyone understands each other clearly.

Here are some tips to get you started:

1) Ask questions

Contrary to popular belief, asking questions is not frowned upon. It is asking stupid questions that frustrate most managers. Questions that have obvious answers. Questions that are not at all related to the conversation.

However, when somebody tells you something you don’t understand, clarify. You don’t want to end up doing the wrong thing and being scolded by your boss afterwards.

2) Be animated

Work environments may tend to be serious, but that doesn’t mean that you have to be stiff all the time. In fact, using gestures is one of the most effective communication strategies in the workplace.

People tend to understand your presentations better when you accompany them with the right gestures. For example, when directing a question or a statement to your audience, try extending one arm outwards with the palm raised up. You can also use your fingers when trying to emphasize numerical values.

3) Make use of facial expressions

Another example of effective communication strategies in the workplace involves using facial expressions. While you do have to maintain some sort of professionalism in the office, you can still allow your face to show emotion.

If you’re trying to motivate your employees or your co-workers, for example, better have your game face on. If you’re discussing something very serious, let the intensity of your eyes do half the discussion for you.

These are just some of the forms of effective communication strategies in the workplace. Some of them might break whatever pre-conceived notions you have about showing emotion or being animated. However, always remember that you must always exercise a proper sense of decorum. Don’t go wild and overdo some of these strategies. Everything must be done in moderation.

Discover secret conversational hypnosis techniques to easily communicate with anyone and put people under your control, without them knowing it! Get a FREE course that reveals some of the most groundbreaking persuasion techniques and secrets at http://www.20daypersuasion.com/secrets.htm

Article Author: Michael Lee

Article Source: http://www.articlealley.com/article_1102432_24.html

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Effective Communication Between Generations

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Even though people in the various generations often don’t agree, there is one thing they all agree on: Respect for each other in the workplace simply doesn’t exist. Those in the older generations (the Silent Generation and the Baby Boomers) think the younger workers of today are lazy and disrespectful. On the other hand, the younger generations (Generation X and the Millennials) think the older workers are stuck in their ways and too closed-minded.

Despite these differences, people from the varying generations must work together productively for the company to succeed. If they let their generational outlooks get in the way, conflict will result.

Use the following suggestions to overcome generational differences so everyone can get along:

Know each other’s preferences

In a nutshell, the Silent Generation and the Baby Boomers prefer face-to-face communication. They like consensus, and they expect everyone to respect authority. They don’t like conflict and will avoid it at all costs.  Generation X and the Millennials love online meetings. They twitter each other and use e-mail the majority of the time. They’re not afraid to confront others; they want their voices heard. They dislike being on teams and prefer to work alone.

While we can’t automatically assume every single person in a particular generation behaves and thinks a certain way, knowing the generalities is a great first step. Therefore, take the initiative to learn about the other generations you work with. The more you understand their point of view and what events shaped their lives, the more you’ll be able to work with them without conflict.

Spend time with each other

Simply knowing each other’s preferences is one thing; it’s another to actually spend time learning from the person. Remember that learning and mentoring is a two-way street. Just as younger people can learn things from older people, the older generation can definitely learn from the “kids.”

As you do this, realize that you’ll likely have to make compromises. For example, a younger person can teach an older person about some new computer communication tool. The younger person will need to employ patience during the training, and the older person will need to keep an open mind to the new technology. You’ll also have to confront your own personal biases and work through them. Only then can you truly benefit from the interaction.

Be open to talking things out

The older people don’t understand what all the pierced noses and tattoos are about, while the younger people can’t comprehend how someone can be so loyal to a company. Instead of just wondering in silence, it’s time to talk it out – with the very people you don’t understand. As long as the conversation stays respectful and does not turn into an accusatory yelling match, it will be a healthy way to gain broader understanding of each other. The sooner you start the conversation, the quicker you’ll resolve differences.

Bridge the Gap

Remember to do the following to effectively communicate between generations:
• Know each other’s preferences
• Spend time with each other
• Be open to talking things out

Generational differences can be tough. However, when you are open and honest and take the time to really listen to each other, you can overcome any perceived differences – real or otherwise.  A little generational understanding can go a long way to boosting the company’s bottom line.

Joyce Weiss, M.A., CSP (Certified Speaking Professional) is a conflict resolution consultant and accountability coach who provides bold solutions to boost the bottom line® for individuals and teams.  Contact Joyce at 800.713.1926.  Resolve conflict and interpersonal issues by looking at video blogs and podcasts at http://JoyceWeiss.com.  Joyce invites you to visit http://www.Joyceweiss.com/newsletter-i-33.html to receive the Bold Solutions Ezine to improve your working condition.

Article Author: Joyce Weiss

Article Source: http://www.articlealley.com/article_2042134_15.html

About the Author: Joyce Weiss, M.A., CSP is a conflict resolution consultant and accountability coach who provides bold solutions to boost the bottom line® for individuals and teams.  She is the author of Take The Ride of Your Life and Full Speed Ahead.  Contact Joyce at 800.713.1926 or Joyce@JoyceWeiss.com.  Resolve conflict and interpersonal issues by  looking at video blogs and podcasts at http://JoyceWeiss.com.  Joyce invites you to visit Joyce’s Bold Solutions Newsletter
to receive the Bold Solutions Ezine to improve your working condition

http://www.JoyceWeiss.com

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