Leadership Training: Tips for Leading Gen Y

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The Gen Y has made their mark! This new type of employee has been the cause of many management and leadership training challenges and few have truly understood what this generation needs and the thinking that goes behind what is seemingly is an unreasonable and unmanageable mindset.

From a leadership training perspective is imperative that leaders of different generations take the time to get inside the heads of their Gen Y employees and to get an understanding of what makes them tick.

Baby Boomers and Gen X leaders are cut from a different cloth. They are accustomed to principles such as proving yourself, climbing the corporate ladder, loyalty to their organisation, appreciation of opportunity and doing what it takes to get further in their own career paths.

These leaders believe they have earned the right to be at their current level of leadership and have a low sense of entitlement. They have got to their positions through sheer hard work, commitment and perseverance.

Now enter a generation who believe quite the opposite. A true test for leadership training professionals.

These leaders are being called to look beyond their own belief system into the realm of new and different ways of thinking.

Gen Y’s however are not trying to be difficult. They have been brought up in a world that is fast moving. They have their finger on the pulse of changing technology and the internet gives them the information they require in a split second. They can access people around the world and send and receive vast amounts of data in any area of their choice.

This pace defines their lives. Anything slow is boring and anything uninspiring is not worth spending time on. Diversity is king and challenge is a “must have”. If it takes too long, dump it!

Can a leadership training process make any meaningful difference to engage employees that think and behave in this way?

The answer is most certainly ‘Yes’, however without the following key actions it may prove ineffective.

Here are 7 Leadership training suggestions that have proved to be successful:

1. Ensure that your Gen Y employees are involved in decision making.

 As the leadership training guru Ken Blanchard claims, “People support and defend what they help create and decide.”

2. Know their needs and expectations of:
– you as their leader
– their team
– their role
– their career aspirations.

3. Give them ownership and autonomy

Gen Y employees want to feel a true sense of accomplishment. For this reason they do not feel a sense of loyalty to the organisation but rather to their jobs. Give them the opportunity to flourish in the path they would prefer to adopt.

4. Praise and acknowledge

They thrive on recognition and reward for a job well done. Many need this to feel alive and worthwhile.

5. Set up “buddy systems” and small teams

Gen Y’s love to work collaboratively. Get them working together, talking and sharing.

6. Encourage creativity and innovation

Set up brainstorming groups for problem solving and invite suggestions and ideas for new and different approaches. Allow them freedom of expression.

7. Never be prescriptive

Gen Y detests being told what to do and how to do it. Rather be suggestive and avoid using any power style of management or leadership.

The case for leadership training is strong. There certainly is no one right approach and with time we will get to further understand and appreciate this wonderful and challenging generation.

Article Author:  Meiron Lees

Meiron Lees is the director of InnerCents, the company is a leading corporate coaching and training company specializing in
executive coaching, leadership training, leadership management training and sales negotiation training.
URL: http://www.innercents.com.au

Article Source: http://www.articlealley.com/article_497643_15.html

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Business Communication

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Common Problems (Business Communication)

Communication plays a big role in an organization between employer and the employee, even though effective business do  not guarantee success in a business set up, its absence will surely lead to problems, this can easily lead t crisis in an organization. However various communication barriers do exist, among them are:

Individual perception

Cultural Barriers and diversity
Cultural barriers are normally at the source of communication challenge. An organization has to explore historical experiences and ways in which different cultural groups relates to one another is key to open channels for cross-cultural communication in any set-up. Organizations have to become more conscious of cultural differences, and also have to explore cultural similarities, this can assist one communicate with others much more effectively. (Pinker, 1997)

Information flood
The structure of communication follow is a crucial issue in how effective business communication is passed on to an audience. It does not matter if the audience is involving one or hundred, good flow is essential if the communication is to be “heard”. Thus a poor flow of your message or delivery is hence a key barrier to effective communication.

Technological changes
Due to current technological advancements there are several medium in which one can use when communicating, however if a wrong medium is selected the message may not reach the intended audience or the audience my not be able to interpret the message. Thus when considering the medium to use when communicating, it is wise to evaluate the percentage of your target audience who are likely to have access to your selected medium at the time you are passing the message. (Pinker, 1997)

Lack of common understanding
Perception; our own preconceived attitudes affects our capability to listen. We normally listen uncritically to individuals of “high status” and dismiss those of “low status”.

Lack of common spirit
When individuals don’t have a common spirit will interpret a particular communication differently, this a definitely a big barrier to communication

Lack of training or experience
Having inefficient knowledge or experience in communication skills, limits one to communicate effectively whether through talking or listening. This thus is a big barrier to communication.

Common Issues (business communication):

People: individual, groups
Centering on ourselves, instead of other persons can lead to confusion and conflict. Some factors that cause this are ego; superiority and defensiveness also hinder effective communication. (Mehrabian and Morton, 1997)

Culture, perception
Culture, background, and prejudice; we permit our previous experiences to alter the meaning of a message. Our culture, bias and background can only be good if they let us use our previous experiences to comprehend something new, but when they change the message meaning then they hamper communication process. (Mehrabian and Morton, 1997)

Channels, information flow
The channel of communication chosen when communicating is critical in ensuring that communication is effective. When some message requires an oral channel other requires writing. Thus if the wrong channel is chosen it will be a barrier to communication.

Environment, network access
Environmental; consist of physical things which can get in our way of communication such as unusual sights, an attractive person, Bright lights, or other stimulus offers potential distraction. (Pinker, 1997)

Need in business communication within the company

The term “organization communication” is normally applied by organizations to mean the process that is used to facilitate the exchange of information and knowledge of the organization with its internal and external publics or individuals that have a direct relationship with the organization. Organization communication is usually used within the organization’s internal communication by the managements as share information with the employees’ investors, customers and the organization partners. Such sharing of information builds communication channels and enhances it. (Pinker, 1997) As Mehrabian and Morton (1997) points out business communication in an organization is very vital as a tool of passing out information and instructions to employees in any organization.

Reference:
Mehrabian, A and Morton, W (1997): Decoding of inconsistent communications, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 6:109-114

Pinker, S (1997): How communication Works. New York: W. W. Norton & Company.

Article Source: http://www.articlealley.com/article_1418391_15.html

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