Communication Tips For The 4 Personality Types

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The history of the four personality types, a.k.a. the four temperaments starts with Hippocrates 24 hundred years ago. Each personality has it’s own strengths and failings. Each one of us is a combination of all the four personalities, but we all have a dominant personality type and a less dominant personality type.

Of all the personality types, the Melancholy likely struggles the most with a low self image as they’ve set such high standards for themselves and other people. To convince melancholies you need to have details. They want to see all of the points on the PowerPoint and have them explained as well as any other detailed material. You may want to provide supplemental material with lots of details to them.

The choleric is the most forceful and active of the 4 types. He’s strong-willed and independent and opinionated. The choleric thrives on activity. To convince cholerics you have to gain their respect. If they view you as uncertain or unprepared you lose. They like winners.

The phlegmatic is better characterized by the words “easy going”. He’s the calm and steady individual who is not easily distracted. He’s the easiest temperament type to get along with. Life for him is happy, unexcited and sedate. To convince a phlegmatic you have to show them how matters are in the best interest of the group. You often need a format where they’re asked their opinion.

The Sanguine is receptive naturally and outgoing. He’s usually called a ‘super-extrovert’. This temperament is commonly thought of as a “natural salesman” but they likewise tend to enter professions that are outgoing like acting. If you want a sanguine personality to attend an event, tell them how much fun it will be or give them a position up front where they’ll be noticed.

It’s a good idea to look at your communication in your personal life or, business communication, or network marketing life and ask, “What is in it for each of the different personalities?”

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