Understanding the Process of Interpersonal Communication

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Through the interpersonal communication process, people maintain and adjust this self-image. The paradigm of human communication is dyadic: two people have a conversation. However, humans have always sought means of extending and enhancing face-to-face communication.

New technology as extended the reach of communication as well as altered the way human relate information to each other.

First, media have had a powerful impact on people’s initial perceptions of other interpersonal transactions. Second, they have influenced the manner in which information about other transactions is processed and interpreted. Third, media distracts persons from the gathering the kind of information they need for effective interpersonal communication.

Models of the interpersonal communication process provide the basis for understanding the complexities of organisation communication.

In the Workplace

Performance appraisal is an interpersonal communication process. Even between two people, it is often not done well. Automating the process is a waste of money and time, and HR departments that go that route are doing charitable work for the vendors of the software. Perception is a vital aspect in the interpersonal communication process. How we perceive ourselves and others affects the way we interpret messages and how we handle ourselves in a given situation.

Beliefs, expectations, hopes, and the other thoughts of both parties affect the interpersonal communication process. People often assume they have successfully delivered or understood a message when in reality they have not. Communication involves more than just talking. It also takes deciding what to say and how, listening, “decoding” signals—words and body language—and checking back on the accuracy of interpretation.

Final Thought

The Ultimate objective of an organization can be attained by maintaining an effective interpersonal communication process, which is an essential part of the organizational behavior study.

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Improve Interpersonal Communication Skills In 3 Simple Steps

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The need to improve interpersonal communication skills grows urgent every day. It’s a skill set highly sought after by companies big and small.

After all, these skills have been used to negotiate treaties, peace talks, salary raises and basically anything else you can think of. They have been used to win battles, campaigns and client deals.

Whatever your battlefield is, they will come to your rescue. Improve your interpersonal communication skills using the tips below.

Step 1: Address People By Their Names

Knowing the names of the people you talk to, and using their names, give you power. People like hearing their name because it shows that you acknowledge their presence. Besides, everyone has been trained to respond to their name since birth.

For example, when asking for an update on a company project, say, “Hey [insert name], what’s the latest on Project X?”

Using people’s names also makes them feel more at ease with you. Just don’t overdo it since that might give people the wrong idea.

Step 2: Be More Relatable

One way to improve interpersonal communication skills is to become more relatable or at least, foster an appearance of being more relatable. Why? Because when people find something in common with you, they are more inclined to trust you.

Don’t act all high and mighty with the people around you, because that merely breeds animosity and contempt. No matter what anyone says, you can’t force cooperation or openness.

Step 3: Be Appreciative

Another good practice to improve your interpersonal communication skills is showing your appreciation.

People are seldom thanked these days. Sure, serving you coffee is part of the secretary’s job, but that doesn’t mean a little thank you won’t go a long way. What about the security guard who opens the door for you? That merits an appreciative smile or a nod at least.

Being appreciative not only gives others a really good impression, it also paves the way for a smooth sailing relationship.

With these tips on how to improve interpersonal communication skills, you are now equipped to face another day of work. This time, however, you will find changes big and small happening all around you.

You will realize how different people react to a person who remembers their name, has the ability to mingle with everybody and appreciates their efforts.

Discover secret conversational hypnosis techniques to easily communicate with anyone and change their way of thinking! Get a FREE course that reveals some of the most groundbreaking mind control techniques and persuasion secrets at http://www.20daypersuasion.com/secrets.htm

Article Author: Michael Lee

Article Source: http://www.articlealley.com/http://www.articlealley.com/improve-interpersonal-communication-skills-in-3-simple-steps-1764149.html

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The Problems With Using Profanity In Workplace Communications

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There are several problems with using profanity in work communications. Even if the workplace environment is laid-back and lenient, or the office culture is friendly and insulated, there are still some universal ground rules and preexisting perspectives on profanity.

Even without going over the individual problems with using profanity in work communications, the underlying issue simply boils down to this: If you put a workplace communication with profanity next to the identical message without the profanity, the one without profanity will always seem smarter, more appropriate, more mature, more professional, and more positive, unless the message is explicitly (excuse the pun) about specific profanity itself.

With that being said, there are some specific problems with using profanity in work communications.

Unprofessional

In every job and field, there are always de facto strictures that determine standards of professionalism. These include appropriate workplace interactions, communication format, dress code, general presentation, event etiquette etc. All of these elements, done the proper way, combine to enhance a reputation and image of professionalism.

Profanity has a very rare place in professionalism. While some less professional fields may let fly with the foul language much more often than others, the reality is that a top executive will not be taken seriously if he or she is casually sprinkling random profanity into his or her work communications. That style of speech is better left for more crude and crass settings, certainly not the workplace.

Uncreative

Utilizing profanity is somewhat of a lazy way to communicate. It creates a cheap, powerful punch in just a single word or two. Often in heated arguments under anger, profanity will unveil itself because the participants are so clouded in their judgment that they cannot, in the heat of the moment, form coherent arguments or cohesive discussion.

Instead of resorting to the tactic of profanity, work communicators should strive to get their point across with other words. Profanity is never necessary to achieve the task of communicating ideas; unless, that is, the idea is to provide crude commentary.

Negative Reflection

With rare (but usually made evident at the time) exceptions, profanity will always serve to detract, rather than enhance, one’s reputation. Using profanity is a tactic usually reserve for immature teens being ignorant, or drunken adults saying regretful things. It is not appropriate for work communications, and will almost always make the person look worse for using it.

Differing Perspectives

But, all things aside, perhaps the biggest problem with using profanity in work communications is that not all people agree on the extent of the unacceptable nature of profanity. Some believe it should not be as taboo, while others may even outright gasp at its use out loud. Just as an effective presentation should take its target audience into account, work communications should keep in mind that the recipient may have a differing, unfavorable view of profanity use.

Overall, even if a worker loves profanity and uses it often in his or her personal life, it is just a common sense conclusion to avoid it in the workplace. Problems with using profanity in work communications can be altogether avoided by just using a little creativity and language skills in its place.

Written by EricBailey

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