Six Things to Avoid in the Job Interview

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Sometimes an interview can be all to change your fate and career for the best. Therefore, it is important that you attend every interview with enthusiasm and the right attitude. To optimize your chances to be successful, remember to avoid the following things while facing an interview. Here are six things you should avoid:

1. Don’t be unprepared
If you have decided to attend an interview then remember to always prepare for it, plan it out, and practice to get your best. Today’s job market is extremely tough and in order to get through you need to have a competitive advantage, a good preparation is key to it.

2. Avoid inability to communicate effectively and clearly
It is an important aspect that is checked in an individual during a job interview. If you are nervous on the spot then you can give out weak and wrong signals that may cost you the job. It is always better to practice in advance, what you plan to say.

3. Avoid being too arrogant or aggressive
Don’t act in an ‘I know it all’ attitude. This will not help at all, and may even cost you the job. Always be humble and act in a very careful manner. Being confident is good but see that you don’t get too over confident while talking to your prospective employer.

4. Stay away from making lame excuses for your past failures
If your career graph or anything of the past shows a failure, accept it. Don’t make lame excuses in front of the employers. Let them know that you have understood your mistake and learnt from it, and that you will be doubly careful in your future.

5. Avoid bad mouthing your previous employer
Even if they were not good or you didn’t have good terms with them, never say anything bad about them during your interview.

6. Avoid a poor or limp handshake
A bad handshake can turn people off and give a wrong impression about you. So, remember to shake hand confidently and firmly.

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Body Language – A Secret to Success

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Building Rapport with People in Business

Actions Speak Louder Than Words: We must have heard of this ever since our school days.

We use our vocal chords to talk, but our facial expressions communicate our inner feelings.

Understanding the body language is an intricate and yet practical skill. By consciously observing what others are trying to say, we can begin to deal with issues at work, home or anyplace, before they become problems.

At work it is the boss who is all powerful. When you observe his body language, you notice how he strives to appear large, powerful and always in control. His status manifests itself ingeniously. On the other hand, individuals who feel vulnerable may appear tense, clasp their hands in front of them, slouch in their chairs, and exhibit typical self manipulative behaviors, to show they are stressed.

A superior who enjoys greater powers generally tends to talk more and interrupt others. Sometimes their body language can also flash some weakness that betrays what they are actually feeling. Does your boss smile as he applauds one of your ideas? How can you tell if the smile is genuine? Paul Ekman, a clinical Psychologist has been researching on facial expressions and deceit, for the last thirty years. He has identified around 18 kinds of smiles and most of them are deceptive according to him. A genuine smile he says will in anxious. These signals need attention.

How do we get the signals straight?

First tune into your own body language. For a whole day observe your gestures when you talk and move, sit or stand. Too stiff a posture indicates rigidity. Observe at the small things you do when you are tense. Are you fiddling with the pen or twirling your hair. Please control that, because it undermines what you want to say.

Get the handshake right. Let it be firm, strong but not with excessive pressure.

Maintain Eye contact. Direct eye contact is the best way to put forward your ideas. It means you are serious about business. If you are uncomfortable, for a brief moment shift the focus between eyes and chin.

How aware are you of your body language?

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Understanding the Process of Interpersonal Communication

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Through the interpersonal communication process, people maintain and adjust this self-image. The paradigm of human communication is dyadic: two people have a conversation. However, humans have always sought means of extending and enhancing face-to-face communication.

New technology as extended the reach of communication as well as altered the way human relate information to each other.

First, media have had a powerful impact on people’s initial perceptions of other interpersonal transactions. Second, they have influenced the manner in which information about other transactions is processed and interpreted. Third, media distracts persons from the gathering the kind of information they need for effective interpersonal communication.

Models of the interpersonal communication process provide the basis for understanding the complexities of organisation communication.

In the Workplace

Performance appraisal is an interpersonal communication process. Even between two people, it is often not done well. Automating the process is a waste of money and time, and HR departments that go that route are doing charitable work for the vendors of the software. Perception is a vital aspect in the interpersonal communication process. How we perceive ourselves and others affects the way we interpret messages and how we handle ourselves in a given situation.

Beliefs, expectations, hopes, and the other thoughts of both parties affect the interpersonal communication process. People often assume they have successfully delivered or understood a message when in reality they have not. Communication involves more than just talking. It also takes deciding what to say and how, listening, “decoding” signals—words and body language—and checking back on the accuracy of interpretation.

Final Thought

The Ultimate objective of an organization can be attained by maintaining an effective interpersonal communication process, which is an essential part of the organizational behavior study.

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