Six Things to Avoid in the Job Interview

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Sometimes an interview can be all to change your fate and career for the best. Therefore, it is important that you attend every interview with enthusiasm and the right attitude. To optimize your chances to be successful, remember to avoid the following things while facing an interview. Here are six things you should avoid:

1. Don’t be unprepared
If you have decided to attend an interview then remember to always prepare for it, plan it out, and practice to get your best. Today’s job market is extremely tough and in order to get through you need to have a competitive advantage, a good preparation is key to it.

2. Avoid inability to communicate effectively and clearly
It is an important aspect that is checked in an individual during a job interview. If you are nervous on the spot then you can give out weak and wrong signals that may cost you the job. It is always better to practice in advance, what you plan to say.

3. Avoid being too arrogant or aggressive
Don’t act in an ‘I know it all’ attitude. This will not help at all, and may even cost you the job. Always be humble and act in a very careful manner. Being confident is good but see that you don’t get too over confident while talking to your prospective employer.

4. Stay away from making lame excuses for your past failures
If your career graph or anything of the past shows a failure, accept it. Don’t make lame excuses in front of the employers. Let them know that you have understood your mistake and learnt from it, and that you will be doubly careful in your future.

5. Avoid bad mouthing your previous employer
Even if they were not good or you didn’t have good terms with them, never say anything bad about them during your interview.

6. Avoid a poor or limp handshake
A bad handshake can turn people off and give a wrong impression about you. So, remember to shake hand confidently and firmly.

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Following up after the Job Interview

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The final stage of nailing the interview is the follow up. After doing all the hard work of preparing for the interview, dressing correctly and being able to answer all the questions which the interviewer asks, the final stage is to follow up from the interview.

Find below a list of the best follow up tactics to use to continue to show your enthusiasm for the role.

Follow up with a letter or email thanking the interviewer for their time and re-expressing your desire for the role and because of your skills and experience you are the right person for the role. A thank you letter not only reiterates your desire, but continues the rapport you already built during the interview.

Rules to follow:

When writing a thank you letter always remember to correctly use their right title and spell their name correctly.

Send your thank you email that evening. You want the interviewer to receive the email in the morning so that they continue to remember who you are and you stay in the forefront of their mind.

Don’t be afraid to follow up with a phone call 3-5 days after the interview. Ideally it is best to ask the interviewer in the interview when they expect to make a decision, but a follow up call is great way to further reiterate your desire for the job.

Do not burn any bridges. You may have felt the interview did not go well or that the role was not for you. That’s ok. Continue your professionalism until the very end. You just never know what else can potentially come from that interview. I have seen cases where the interviewer was impressed with a candidate and although they did not have the right skills for that particular job they created a new position for that candidate.

The big misconception from candidates is that the interviewer does not want to be disturbed with follow up. THIS IS WRONG. Many hiring managers will observe the candidates who do follow up. Stand out from other potential candidates by making sure you follow through to the end.

Example thank you email
Dear Mr./Ms. Last Name:
Thank you for giving me the opportunity to interview for the position of XYZ . It was a pleasure to meet you, and I appreciate your time and consideration in interviewing me for this position.
Following our discussion I consider that I have all the skills and requirements to fulfil your job. Having been a manager for 3 years and a project manager for 2 years, I have the desire to lead the team in a positive and productive way.
In addition to my technical skills I bring enthusiasm and energy into everything I do in order to get the job done in an efficient and timely manner.
I am very keen on this role and working for company ABC. If you require any further information from me please contact me anytime on XXX XXX XXXX.
Thank you again for your time and consideration.
Sincerely,

Your Full Name

RedStarResume – Professional Resume Writing – The #1 choice for resume writing, cv writing, LinkedIn Profiles and resume distribution.
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Understanding the Process of Interpersonal Communication

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Through the interpersonal communication process, people maintain and adjust this self-image. The paradigm of human communication is dyadic: two people have a conversation. However, humans have always sought means of extending and enhancing face-to-face communication.

New technology as extended the reach of communication as well as altered the way human relate information to each other.

First, media have had a powerful impact on people’s initial perceptions of other interpersonal transactions. Second, they have influenced the manner in which information about other transactions is processed and interpreted. Third, media distracts persons from the gathering the kind of information they need for effective interpersonal communication.

Models of the interpersonal communication process provide the basis for understanding the complexities of organisation communication.

In the Workplace

Performance appraisal is an interpersonal communication process. Even between two people, it is often not done well. Automating the process is a waste of money and time, and HR departments that go that route are doing charitable work for the vendors of the software. Perception is a vital aspect in the interpersonal communication process. How we perceive ourselves and others affects the way we interpret messages and how we handle ourselves in a given situation.

Beliefs, expectations, hopes, and the other thoughts of both parties affect the interpersonal communication process. People often assume they have successfully delivered or understood a message when in reality they have not. Communication involves more than just talking. It also takes deciding what to say and how, listening, “decoding” signals—words and body language—and checking back on the accuracy of interpretation.

Final Thought

The Ultimate objective of an organization can be attained by maintaining an effective interpersonal communication process, which is an essential part of the organizational behavior study.

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