Following up after the Job Interview

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The final stage of nailing the interview is the follow up. After doing all the hard work of preparing for the interview, dressing correctly and being able to answer all the questions which the interviewer asks, the final stage is to follow up from the interview.

Find below a list of the best follow up tactics to use to continue to show your enthusiasm for the role.

Follow up with a letter or email thanking the interviewer for their time and re-expressing your desire for the role and because of your skills and experience you are the right person for the role. A thank you letter not only reiterates your desire, but continues the rapport you already built during the interview.

Rules to follow:

When writing a thank you letter always remember to correctly use their right title and spell their name correctly.

Send your thank you email that evening. You want the interviewer to receive the email in the morning so that they continue to remember who you are and you stay in the forefront of their mind.

Don’t be afraid to follow up with a phone call 3-5 days after the interview. Ideally it is best to ask the interviewer in the interview when they expect to make a decision, but a follow up call is great way to further reiterate your desire for the job.

Do not burn any bridges. You may have felt the interview did not go well or that the role was not for you. That’s ok. Continue your professionalism until the very end. You just never know what else can potentially come from that interview. I have seen cases where the interviewer was impressed with a candidate and although they did not have the right skills for that particular job they created a new position for that candidate.

The big misconception from candidates is that the interviewer does not want to be disturbed with follow up. THIS IS WRONG. Many hiring managers will observe the candidates who do follow up. Stand out from other potential candidates by making sure you follow through to the end.

Example thank you email
Dear Mr./Ms. Last Name:
Thank you for giving me the opportunity to interview for the position of XYZ . It was a pleasure to meet you, and I appreciate your time and consideration in interviewing me for this position.
Following our discussion I consider that I have all the skills and requirements to fulfil your job. Having been a manager for 3 years and a project manager for 2 years, I have the desire to lead the team in a positive and productive way.
In addition to my technical skills I bring enthusiasm and energy into everything I do in order to get the job done in an efficient and timely manner.
I am very keen on this role and working for company ABC. If you require any further information from me please contact me anytime on XXX XXX XXXX.
Thank you again for your time and consideration.
Sincerely,

Your Full Name

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How Important Is Cultural Awareness In Business?

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Shaking Hands with People from other Cultures

Cultural awareness is a hugely important aspect of business interaction. Failing to understand how these elements play out in a negotiation can very easily leave you on the back foot.

Effective negotiating is hard enough as it is. You have to understand and be able to effectively read and react to a range of body language, negotiating strategies and understand exactly how far you are prepared to go to achieve your objective. This is made all the harder when international factors are thrown into the mix. Body language, interpersonal behaviours and interpretation of language are all affected differently by different cultures and a number of business thinkers and academics have devoted their energies to identifying and attempting to explore these differences and how they can be understood for greater negotiation success.

Examples of differences in international business negotiations: To ask an Asian business person to make a yes or no decision during negotiation will be highly damaging. Their cultural norm is to avoid displeasing others with negative responses, and they will go to great lengths to avoid ‘losing face’ by admitting that they lack the ability to do something. This is shown particularly in the Thai culture where there isn’t a word meaning ‘no’ in the Thai language! In a similar way French business people will tend to say no outright when they are actually considering options and meaning ‘maybe’.

In other countries, the norm is to give people the answer that they want to hear when they ask a question – which can be highly confusing in business negotiations! This is commonplace in Japan, Mexico or Lebanon.

Maintaining eye contact is viewed as being important in America and those who don’t do it arouse suspicion for being shifty. However in other countries, an attempt to keep eye contact is viewed as being aggressive, and it’s particularly offensive in countries such as Taiwan, South Korea and Japan. However, if you’re negotiating in Saudi Arabia, make sure you do keep open and consistent eye contact, as it’s viewed as being highly important to facilitating communication. There are other more specific cultural differences too, which if not followed, can cause great offence. For example in Saudi Arabia once again, it’s considered to be insulting to ask after the health of the host’s spouse, pass items using the left hand or show the soles of your shoes.

Similarly in Korea, make sure you pass with both hands, and avoid discussing politics or anything related to Japan. Formal greetings and introductions are also very important here and use rank and title when addressing guests.

Relationships are highly valued in many cultures, particularly in Asian and European cultures where the longer-term benefits of a relationship are valued more highly than short term transactions and quick wins. This is often opposite to the views of American business people who value speed and will often negotiate aggressively to achieve short term objectives.

The important thing to note is that whilst it may not be practical to learn a foreign language to carry out a particular negotiation, it can be possible to rapidly learn enough about non-verbal communication for international parties to the procedure, thus avoiding potentially costly errors.

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Article by Linguarama:

Linguarama is the right partner for Business Language Training and Cross Cultural Training, whether for individual tuition or corporate language training.

Article Source: http://www.articlealley.com/http://mb011085.articlealley.com/how-important-is-cultural-awareness-in-business-1608596.html

 

 

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