Learning Styles

0

We all have preferences for how we learn best. Are you visual, auditory or kinaesthetic? Put another way, do you like to see what I mean, or prefer to hear my idea or are you someone who likes to experience or feel what is being talked about.

A person’s learning style is a combination of how they perceive, then organise and finally process information. Once you’re familiar with your learning style, you can take action to help yourself learn faster and more easily.

Plus, learning how to decipher the learning styles of others, like your boss, colleagues, teacher and family can help you strengthen your rapport and influence with them. Determining your own personal learning style is a key to improved performance at work, in training and study, and in social situations. Trainers, teachers and educators are (very slowly) realising that everyone has an optimal way of taking in new information and that some students need to be taught in ways that vary from standard teaching methods. Traditional teaching and assessment has always been aimed at visual learners.

Just as some people have a preference for being right or left-handed, we appear to have a preference for the way we sense the world. To decipher your predominant learning style, the first step is to identify your preferred sense – whether you prefer visual, auditory, or kinaesthetic. As these terms suggest, visual people learn through what they see, auditory learners from what they hear, and kinaesthetic learners from movement and touching.

Although each of us learns in all three of these ways to some degree, most people prefer one over the other two. Do you ever catch yourself saying things like “That looks right to me,” or “I get the picture”? Or are you more likely to say, “That sounds right to me,” or “That rings a bell”? Or “I like the feel of that,” or “I grasp it now”? Expressions like these may be clues to your preferred modality.

If you couldn’t see or hear, or if you couldn’t feel texture, shape, temperature, weight, or resistance in your environment, you would literally have no way of learning. Most of us learn in many ways, yet we usually favour one modality over the others. Many people don’t realise they are favouring one way, because nothing external tells them they are any different from anyone else. Knowing that there are differences goes a long way towards explaining why we have problems understanding and communicating with some people and not with others, and why we handle some situations more easily than others.

So how do you discover your own preferred modality? One simple way is to listen for clues in your speech, as in the expressions above. Another way is to notice your behaviour when you attend a seminar or workshop. Do you seem to get more from reading the handout or from listening to the presenter? Auditory people prefer listening to the material and sometimes get lost if they try to take notes on the subject during the presentation. Visual people prefer to read the handouts and look at the slides the presenter shows. Visual people also take excellent notes. Kinaesthetic learners do best with “hands on” activities and group interaction.

The bad news regarding learning styles is that school and college are easier for people who score highest on the “visual” learning style preference. So if you are predominantly auditory or kinaesthetic, you may be at an initial disadvantage. It’s not that visual learners are smarter, it’s just that they think in a certain way that matches up perfectly with how schools and examining boards around the world test.  They test in the written form – usually 1, 2 or even 3 hour written examinations.

Visual learners think in pictures, so it makes it easier for them to learn and remember new information. For everything they read, it’s as if they were watching TV or movies in their heads. There is an old saying – one picture is worth a thousand words.  So, when visual learners want to remember what they have learned, they replay that movie in their mind that they already made while they were studying.

By now, you’re probably asking, so what about me?  “Is there an easy way for me to get higher grades if I my learning style preference is more auditory or more kinaesthetic”?

Yes, there is! And you’ll have to do it because until we come up with a better way to find out what you have learned in school, then written tests are going to be around for a very long time.

So, the tip is to learn how to add some visual thinking strategies to the learning style you already have. That then gives you even more learning abilities.

Those who are having the easiest time with their study think in pictures, and the way you can do that is to pretend that you’re going to turn everything you read or hear in the classroom or from a textbook into a movie in your mind.

You know how you look up at the movie screen when you’re at the movies – well, if you do the same thing in the classroom to get more “visual”, then school or college will get a whole lot easier.

If you’re really serious about wanting better grades, then give it a try.

This has been a very brief introduction to this important and exciting area.
——

Author: Lisabeth Protherough

Copyright 2006 Lisabeth Protherough

Lisabeth Protherough is a qualified Chartered Accountant and Education Consultant from the UK, with 20 years experience training and teaching students in the university and business sectors. She heads up Student Success Solutions a global organisation offering educational advice to students around the world. She is passionate about great education and the life changing impact it can have. Lisabeth is on a mission to make education interesting and to help students unlock their potential.

http://www.student-success-tools.co.uk
http://www.hearts-and-minds-global.com/
http://www.student-success-solutions-recommends-subliminalpower.co.uk

Article Source: http://www.articlealley.com/learning-styles-62351.html

Share

How to Give Feedback to Manage Performance

0

Author: Kate Tammemagi

Receiving feedback on your effort, your attitude or your performance is the way that you learn, improve or are motivated to maintain a good performance. Giving feedback effectively and frequently is a key requirement of the role of Manager or Supervisor. Giving and receiving feedback should be a normal part of the Leader and Team Member relationship, a process that both parties understand and accept. It is best practice for the Supervisor to begin giving feedback as part of the initial training period, and to continue this in regular performance coaching sessions throughout the employee’s career.

Positive Feedback
Positive feedback can be given any time, either in public or private. Positive feedback is where we praise a desired attitude, behaviour or performance. The effect of positive feedback is that the person is encouraged to repeat this behaviour and is also motivated to improve. It also builds self confidence and self esteem in the Team Member.

The reverse is also true! Lack of positive feedback is discouraging, demotivating and will lead to a poor performance level. The employee gets the impression that no-one cares whether they do well or not, and that their work has no value!

Giving Constructive  Feedback

The other type of feedback is Constructive Feedback, or Corrective Feedback. Again, this is essential to performance and motivation. Do not think in terms of NEGATIVE feedback as this is not a useful thought. The aim is not to point out the negative or the bad. If you do this, you will find that the person does not improve. You will find yourself saying the same things over and over again.

Giving constructive feedback is about TRAINING the other person to change or improve. If you do this well, you training is successful and will see the desired result. Giving constructive feedback is about identifying an area for improvement and working out solutions to improve or correct this. In giving the feedback, first identify the current goal or task and why this is important to the Company and to the role. Secondly, state clearly the undesirable attitude, behaviour or performance, with factual evidence. Thirdly, state the desired attitude, behaviour or performance, or better still, ask encouraging questions to help the other person make constructive suggestions. Lastly, work with them to put a strategy in place for achieving the desired goal.

Guidelines for giving Feedback Effectively

1. Understand that the feedback is primarily a training need. Be aware that you are the supervisor, and are ultimately responsible for this staff’s behaviour. This feedback is aimed at improving knowledge and behaviour.

2. The key is to talk about the behaviour, performance or attitude rather than the person.

3. Have a good working knowledge of your own learning style and the other types of learning styles. This will help you avoid the pitfall of explaining in a way only YOU would understand. Other people are not always like you!

4. Know your Team Member, their personality style and their unique learning style – Are they a visual, verbal, reading & writing, tactile? Do they have language and cultural complexities?

5. Know your own limitations – If you are giving feedback on a volatile situation, make sure you can recognize your own emotions, and are aware that you may need to calm down before feedback.

6. Give constructive feedback in private – Never give constructive feedback in a group. You would not want to receive it in front of your staff!

7. Always start with positive – When giving feedback you always start with at least two positive observations. This will start the meeting off on a positive note

8. Look at the individual – make eye contact, don’t avoid. If you do, they may question the validity of your session.

9. No apologies, do not apologize for their actions that need correction. Don’t say, “I’m sorry to tell you this, but…”

10. Give constructive feedback in an honest and diplomatic way – that is, while pinpointing the target behaviour, state the constructive measures to change the behaviour. Remember, constructive feedback is a means to improving situations by finding a solution to the problem. Give a due date for follow up. The point is to teach a new skill where there was a deficiency.

11. End with a positive – If it was a particularly lengthy/ gruesome session, interact with the staff to make sure things are ok. Be sure that you have checked in with them before you leave for the day. You want to make sure they are not going home disappointed.

12. Ask if they have any questions – if you have given a feedback session, you may not have realised that you were the only one talking for quite some time. Always give the staff the opportunity to seek further knowledge or assistance.
Kate Tammemagi specialises in Management Training in Ireland. She designs and delivers People Management Training and Customer Care Training.
Article Source: http://www.articlealley.com/how-to-give-feedback-to-manage-performance-1335512.html

About the Author: Kate Tammemagi is Trainer and Consultant in Ireland. She specialises in delivering customised Customer Service Training Courses and Leadership Development Training Courses  in businesses,  call centres and professional environments.

http://www.focustraining.ie

Share

The Significance of Eye Contact

0

Do you struggle to remember the names of so many individuals with whom you come in contact on a daily basis.  Some executives study remember-that-name books and those techniques do work occasionally.

What is their goal?  These leaders want their associates to know that although each is maintaining a fast pace, they are cared for, held in esteem, and are worthy.

Can one can accomplish the same connection without the pressure to remember names, but instead with the pleasure of sincere eye contact?

In First Impressions, What You Don’t Know About How Others See You, authors Ann Demarais, Ph.D. and Valerie White, Ph.D. describe visual connections like this:

Eye contact is a clear indication of interest, especially in American culture.  We normally look others in the eye most of the time we are talking to them.  The rest of the time we may be looking at their mouths, other parts of their faces, or briefly away. If you know your own eye-contact pattern, you are in a position to control the messages you want to send.  If you want to show interest, you can hold your gaze longer, even just a fraction of a second longer than normal.  Most people are very aware of being looked at and will feel this small difference—getting the message that you like them or find them appealing.

I know from my years of teaching networking workshops, that the main reason you might forget names is that you are distracted by what you are going to say to this person, thus focusing on yourself rather than the individual with whom you are speaking.  It would be so simple to just change your focus to them!

A small percentage of communication takes place via the words you speak.The balance of non-verbal communication lies in bodily movement and that includes your visual connection.  According to Demarais and White, it only takes four seconds to make a first impression.  In the first few moments of a conversation, what do you think would be most effective – looking the individual directly in his eye or mumbling about your inability and sorrow over forgetting his name?

This week, release your inner pressure to remember names.  Focus instead on a deeper form of recognition and communication that you care — look deeply into the artwork of each individual’s eyes. You can reap rich rewards for both you and the person who’s name you cannot remember by know how this simple eye contact technique affects him.  Enjoy your discoveries and have a grand week.

——

Article Author: Ann Golden

Ann Golden Eglé, Master Certified Coach and President of Golden Visions Success Coaching can be reached at 541-385-8887 or http://www.GVSuccess.com
Article Source: http://www.articlealley.com/the-significance-of-eye-contact-487876.html

Share
Page 1 of 212
© Copyright Interpersonal Communication Blog - Theme by Pexeto